The following is a summary of Nevada property division laws, and is by no means intended to be an all-inclusive description of what to expect in your particular case. In some cases, the exact text of the statute may have been simplified and/or modified to provide for easier understanding. For a more specific understanding of the laws, you should consult the full Nevada Code and/or consult with an attorney about how the law might apply to your particular situation.

Guidelines Determining Property Division.

Unless the action is contrary to an enforceable premarital agreement between the parties:

In granting a divorce, the court shall make an equal disposition of the community property of the parties if possible, except that the court may make an unequal disposition of the community property if it finds a compelling reason to do so.

If a party has made a contribution of separate property to the acquisition or improvement of property held in joint tenancy, the court may provide for the reimbursement of that party for his contribution. The amount of reimbursement must not exceed the amount of the contribution of separate property that can be traced to the acquisition or improvement of property held in joint tenancy, without interest or any adjustment because of an increase in the value of the property held in joint tenancy. The amount of reimbursement must not exceed the value, at the time of the disposition, of the property held in joint tenancy for which the contribution of separate property was made. In determining whether to provide for the reimbursement, in whole or in part, of a party who has contributed separate property, the court shall consider:

  1. The intention of the parties in placing the property in joint tenancy;
  2. The length of the marriage; and
  3. Any other factor which the court deems relevant in making a just and equitable disposition of that property.

As used in this subsection, “contribution” includes a down payment, a payment for the acquisition or improvement of property, and a payment reducing the principal of a loan used to finance the purchase or improvement of property. The term does not include a payment of interest on a loan used to finance the purchase or improvement of property, or a payment made for maintenance, insurance or taxes on property.

If it deems it equitable, the court may also set apart a portion of either spouse’s property for the other’s support or for the support of their children.

-From the Nevada Revised Statutes 125.150

 

This information has been summarized from the Nevada statutes. You can find the full-text version of these and other Nevada divorce statutes online here: Nevada Divorce Laws.

LEARN MORE ABOUT GENERAL PROPERTY DIVISION LAWS.

GO TO ANOTHER DIVORCE ARTICLE.

 

IMPORTANT: Help Yourself Divorce is a paralegal service, not a law firm. Please don’t rely on this information for legal advice. Seek help from an attorney if you need legal advice.

 

If your divorce is uncontested, we would love to guide you through the process from beginning to end. Learn more about how our uncontested divorce services can help you through your divorce.